Is a HKADCP registered clinical psychologist a qualified clinical psychologist?

Making reference to latest international professional standards, HKADCP has laid clear and objective criteria for admission of registered clinical psychologist (Please click here for details) . Apart from high requirement for doctorate level of applicants, HKADCP also has adopted credential criteria requirement, under which applicant's professional qualification is counterchecked by at least one of the established and reputed professional or statutory psychological organizations in comparable developed countries.

Publication

March 08, 2017

The reliability and validity of a Campus Caring Instrument developed for undergraduate students in Hong Kong.

Ng, P., Su, S., Chan, V., Leung, H., Cheung, W., & Tsun, A

Journal

Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development

Abstract

This study validated a Perceived Campus Caring Scale with 1,520 university students. Using factor analysis, seven factors namely, Faculty Support, Nonfaculty Support, Peer Relationship, Sense of Detachment, Sense of Belonging, Caring Attitude, and Campus Involvement, are identified with high reliability, validity, and close correlation with the Satisfaction With Life Scale.

Information source:

Petrus Ng

Clinical Psychologist, HKADCP

November 14, 2015

Mindfulness based intervention in reducing burnout syndrome in geriatric healthcare providers in Chinese population: A case study

Hall. P

Alliant International University, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2015. 3735216.

Abstract

This study examined the effectiveness of an individual mindfulness-based intervention to alleviate burnout in geriatric healthcare providers in Hong Kong. This case study examined the effects of the intervention on a geriatric healthcare professional working in a nursing home in Hong Kong who presented with symptoms of burnout. Burnout is commonly found in intensive care personnel. Many studies in recent years have shown that mindfulness-based group intervention is effective in reducing stress and burnout in healthcare professionals; however, few studies have examined the effects of individual treatment of burnout among geriatric healthcare professionals in the Chinese population. This study also used mindfulness meditation model of 15 forms of mindfulness meditation combined with psychoeducation of burnout and stress. An individual intervention seemed applicable to this population due to their work overload and tight schedule within the Hong Kong geriatric healthcare services. The participant received a 6-week mindfulness-based intervention, comprising 12 hours of class time, and completed measures of mindfulness, compassion, burnout, anxiety, stress, and depression at baseline, midway, post, and 90 days following the intervention. The participants also gave weekly ratings of responses to stressful situations at work. Findings indicated that mindfulness training significantly correlated to self-compassion levels and were associated with reduced symptoms of burnout. These results seem to infer the feasibility and usefulness of individual mindfulness interventions for geriatric healthcare professionals in the Chinese population.

 

Information source:

Pauline Hall

Clinical Psychologist, HKADCP

March 15, 2014

Promoting resilience in substance abuse professionals who work with individuals with comorbid substance abuse and trauma in Hong Kong: Needs assessment and recommendations for intervention

Lau. C.

This study sought to address the needs of substance abuse professionals (SAPs) in Hong Kong who work with individuals with comorbid substance abuse and trauma. It also sought to evaluate factors that might promote resilience and reduce the likelihood of secondary traumatic stress among these professionals, as well asto elicit professionals’ perceptions of needs and services to support their work with traumatized individuals. To achieve this, this study examined the kind of

traumatic material to which SAPs are exposed, how this material affects their mentaland physical health, their

thoughts about their work, and also their needs to continue in this work.

The study utilized a qualitative, critical incident interview approach to collect narratives of 20 social workers in substance abuse treatment centers who were currently working with individuals with comorbid substance abuse and trauma.The results showed that it was very common for SAPs to be exposed to traumatic material. The traumatic material included childhood, adolescent, and adult traumatic experiences related to sexual, physical, psychological abuse and neglect, and clients’ suicidal attempts and deaths.

 

Client suicide, which the SAPS responded to with great shock, sorrow, deep guilt, and numbness , was among the most difficult experiences to manage. Resilience took the form of growth that occurred as a result from their struggle to deal with secondary trauma and its consequences. This growth included increased awareness of the importance of self-care and personal needs, an increased sense of empathy for their clients, finding meaning in helping, a broadened life perspective , and more tolerance and patience to face life’s difficulties. SAPs coping strategies included spirituality, positive thinking, self-talk, mindfulness, engaging in pleasurable and relaxing activities, and seeking out professional help, such as therapy.

Among the needs SAPs identified to support this difficult work, participants emphasized sharing with fellow colleagues and supervisors, and more individual, clinical, and peer supervision. Clinical trainings on trauma work, education on trauma and secondary trauma, trainings on resilience and the handling of client suicide are also needed to reduce the impact of secondary traumatization .

Information source:

Cora Lau

Clinical Psychologist, HKADCP

March 15, 2014

Long wait for psychiatrist can have tragic consequences.

Tsang, S.K..

South China Morning Post.

 

Excerpt : Hong Kong is a rich city but very poor indeed when it comes to the mental health resources provided to the public. The shortage of psychiatrists in the public health sector, on which most citizens rely, is one of the major reasons needy people fail to get timely psychiatric services and the necessary intervention.

Suicidal risk assessment poses a great challenge to mental health professionals. They cannot say with absolute certainty that patients will definitely not harm themselves or other people after they leave the consultation room. Nonetheless, these patients should be attended to in a timely fashion. This allows professionals to more effectively assess if a person may hurt him or herself and perhaps another person.

We understand there is no quick way to solve the shortage of psychiatric professionals. However, the government should allocate more resources for mental health services. When deciding how the money should be spent, officials could look to good examples set by countries like the US regarding suicidal assessment. Patients are assessed in hospitals by a team of mental health professionals. Clinical psychologists, occupational therapists and psychiatric nurses are properly trained to handle patients with emotionally disturbed and psychiatric conditions. Having patients jointly assessed by them at the triage level would be a feasible solution.

Information source:

Ken Tsang

Clinical Psychologist, HKADCP

July 31, 2011

The effects of a 12-month community mental health care service in Hong Kong.

Ng, P., Wan, E., Law, K. K., Yip, C. Y., Lau, R., Law, W. Y., Lee, P. T. & Tse, K. M.

The Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, 45(1/2), 59-72. DOI: 10.1142/S0219211000076. (Summer/Winter, 2011)

Information source:

Petrus Ng

Clinical Psychologist, HKADCP

November 23, 2012

Recovering from hallucinations: A qualitative study of coping with voices hearing of people with schizophrenia in Hong Kong. The Scientific World Journal.

Ng, P., Chun, R W.K., Tsun, A.

The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 232619, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/232619

Abstract

Auditory hallucination is a positive symptom of schizophrenia and has significant impacts on the lives of individuals. People with auditory hallucination require considerable assistance from mental health professionals. Apart from medications, they may apply different lay methods to cope with their voice hearing. Results from qualitative interviews showed that people with schizophrenia in the Chinese sociocultural context of Hong Kong were coping with auditory hallucination in different ways, including (a) changing social contacts, (b) manipulating the voices, and (c) changing perception and meaning towards the voices. Implications for recovery from psychiatric illness of individuals with auditory hallucinations are discussed.

Information source:

Petrus Ng

Clinical Psychologist, HKADCP

August 31, 2013

Cognitive behavioral intervention in the Chinese cultural context: A case report.

Ng P, Tsun A, Su S, Young D.

Asia Pac Psychiatry.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Depression is predicted to become the world's second leading cause of disability by 2020 according to the World Health Organization. Cognitive behavioral intervention (CBI), recognized as a viable and effective treatment for depression, is becoming more widely used among Chinese clients. However, information about the application of this Western approach in the Chinese population is very limited.

METHODS:

This paper discusses adaptations of CBI protocols for Chinese patients, considering the major Chinese cultural characteristics of predestination, losing face, avoiding conflict, and Yin-Yang balance (PLAY) for persons with depression.

RESULTS:

Illustrated is the application of the PLAY protocol in the actual case of a 35-year-old woman with depression. Implications for integrating Chinese cultural characteristics with CBI are discussed.

DISCUSSION:

There is evidence for adaptations of CBI for enhancing its effectiveness among Chinese people within their cultural context. Since there are limited studies on cultural-sensitive CBI for Chinese people, the conclusions drawn from this study are only preliminary. Further studies that verify the findings reported in this paper are necessary.

Copyright © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

Information source:

Petrus Ng

Clinical Psychologist, HKADCP

June 15, 2010

Developing clinical competence with Chinese consultee: Applying a generic model in mental health social work consultation.

Ng, P & Ho, W.C.

Practice: Social Work in Action, 22(3), June 2010, pp.167-179.

Abstract

Noting that the primary purpose of supervision or consultation is to help consultees to work more effectively, this paper discusses the tasks and roles of the clinical consultant at different stages of the consultation process. Using a particular consultation case, where the consultee is a mental health social worker working in a non-government community mental health organisation for people with severe mental illness and a history of violence, this paper demonstrates the application of a 4 stage generic model in mental health consultation. The 4 stages making up the generic model are: entry, diagnosis, implementation and disengagement. The article presents excerpts from the discussions between the consultee and the consultant about the case. The authors discuss the consultation, the Hong Kong context, and practice implications.

Information source:

Petrus Ng

Clinical Psychologist, HKADCP

September 22, 2008

Integrated group program for improving sleep quality of elderly people.

Ng P, Chan KF.

Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 51(3-4), 367-378. DOI: 10.1080/01634370802039726.

 

Abstract

This article reports an exploratory study on the effects of an integrated group program for improving the sleep quality of elderly people in Hong Kong. Elderly people aged over 55 who had obtained a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) score > 5 were recruited as subjects of the study. While 19 subjects of the treatment group were taking part in an integrated group program involving social group work intervention as well as Chinese medicine therapeutics, 9 subjects of comparison group received no intervention. Using a pretest and posttest design, the study revealed positive effects of the integrated group program. It has added knowledge serving the development of interventions that can help to improve the sleep quality of elderly people.

Information source:

Petrus Ng

Clinical Psychologist, HKADCP

October 09, 2008

Experience in coping with Alzheimer’s disease at home: A study of Chinese family caregivers,

Ng, P. and Ho, W.C.

Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation

 

Abstract

Alzheimers Disease is a form of progressive dementia associated with diffuse degeneration of the brain, and has become more common in Hong Kong as the population has aged. Individuals with Alzheimers Disease may experience symptoms such as memory loss, poor judgement, and incontinence. They generally lack selfcare ability and require considerable care as their illness progresses. As the traditional caring function of Chinese families has been eroded, individuals with the disease pose new challenges to their family caregivers. Research using an intensive interview method revealed that family caregivers of people with Alzheimers Disease suffer heavy psychosocial, financial, and physical burdens.

Information source:

Petrus Ng

Clinical Psychologist, HKADCP

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